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Most Frequent Conditions in U.S. Hospitals, 2010
 
STATISTICAL BRIEF #148


January 2013


Most Frequent Conditions in U.S. Hospitals, 2010


Anne Pfuntner, Lauren M. Wier, M.P.H., and Carol Stocks, R.N., M.H.S.A.



Introduction

A patient can be admitted to the hospital with multiple conditions or diagnoses. The principal diagnosis is the condition that is primarily responsible for a patient's hospitalization. This condition can affect other components of the patient's hospital stay, including the length of stay, health care costs, and procedures performed.

This Statistical Brief presents data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) on the most common principal diagnoses in 2010 for all hospital stays in the United States, as well as for stays by age and primary payer. Changes in the overall number of stays and the rate of hospitalization in the population are presented for the most common conditions in 1997 and 2010. All differences between estimates noted in the text are statistically significant at the .001 level or better.

Findings

Most frequent principal diagnoses during hospital stays, 2010
Table 1 shows the most frequent principal diagnoses during hospital stays in 2010. In 2010, there were 39 million hospital stays in the U.S.—1,261 stays per 10,000 population. The 10 most frequent principal diagnoses accounted for 30 percent of all stays in 2010.

Liveborn (newborn infant) was the most common reason for hospitalization, accounting for more than 3.9 million stays in 2010 (10 percent of all stays).

Two respiratory illnesses—pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)—were among the 10 most frequent principal diagnoses in 2010. Pneumonia was the second most common reason for hospitalization in 2010 (2.8 percent of all stays).

Two circulatory conditions—congestive heart failure (CHF) and cardiac dysrhythmias—were also among the 10 most common principal diagnoses in 2010.
Highlights
  • Liveborn (newborn infant) was the most common reason for hospitalization in 2010 (3.9 million stays) and accounted for about 10 percent of all hospital stays.


  • Pneumonia was the second most common diagnosis in 2010 and accounted for about 2.8 percent of all stays.


  • Acute renal failure was the most rapidly growing condition between 1997 and 2010, with an increase of 264 percent in the rate of hospitalization.


  • Mood disorders was the most common principal diagnosis among children ages 1-17.


  • Obstetrics-related trauma was the most common diagnosis among adults ages 18-44.


  • Osteoarthritis was the most common diagnosis among adults ages 45-64 and 65-84.


  • Among adults ages 18-44, the rate of hospitalization for normal pregnancy and/or delivery fell 56 percent between 1997 and 2010, but the rate of hospitalization for delivery following a Cesarean section increased 82 percent.


  • Four of the most common conditions for uninsured hospital stays increased by 50 percent or more from 1997 to 2010: skin and subcutaneous tissue infections, mood disorders, nonspecific chest pain, and alcohol-related disorders.


Table 1. Number of stays and stays per 10,000 population for the most frequent principal diagnoses for hospital stays, 2010
Principal CCS diagnosis Number of stays in thousands Stays per 10,000 population
All stays 39,008 1,261
Liveborn 3,906 126
Pneumonia* 1,103 36
Osteoarthritis 974 31
Congestive heart failure; nonhypertensive 967 31
Septicemia (except in labor) 934 30
Mood disorders 887 29
Cardiac dysrhythmias 764 25
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis 703 23
Complication of device; implant or graft 684 22
Obstetrics-related trauma to perineum and vulva 674 22
CCS: Clinical Classifications Software
* Pneumonia: except that caused by tuberculosis or sexually transmitted disease
Source: AHRQ, Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2010


Principal diagnoses with the most rapid growth, 1997-2010
Although the rate of hospitalization overall remained stable between 1997 and 2010, the hospitalization rate for some principal diagnoses experienced rapid growth (table 2). Acute renal failure was the most rapidly growing condition between 1997 and 2010, with an increase of 264 percent in the hospitalization rate (from 3.6 to 13.1 stays per 10,000 population). The hospitalization rate for 5 conditions—prolonged pregnancy, pulmonary heart disease, osteoarthritis, anemia, and septicemia—also doubled during this time period.


Table 2. Number of stays, stays per 10,000 population, and percentage change in rate of selected principal diagnoses for hospital stays, 1997 and 2010
Principal CCS diagnosis Number of stays in thousands Stays per 10,000 population Percentage change in rate
1997 2010 1997 2010 1997-2010
All stays 34,681 39,008 1,272 1,261 -1%
Diagnoses with most rapid growth in stays per population*
Acute and unspecified renal failure 98 404 3.6 13.1 264%
Prolonged pregnancy 104 278 3.8 9.0 136%
Pulmonary heart disease 80 193 2.9 6.2 112%
Osteoarthritis 418 974 15.3 31.5 106%
Deficiency and other anemia 100 230 3.7 7.4 103%
Septicemia (except in labor) 413 934 15.2 30.2 99%
Skin and subcutaneous tissue infections 330 656 12.1 21.2 75%
Previous Cesarean section 271 503 10.0 16.3 63%
Respiratory failure; insufficiency; arrest (adult) 199 363 7.3 11.7 61%
Intestinal infection 136 237 5.0 7.7 54%
CCS: Clinical Classifications Software
* Includes only conditions with at least 100,000 stays in either 1997 or 2010
Source: AHRQ, Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1997 and 2010


Most frequent principal diagnoses by age during hospital stays, 2010
Table 3 highlights the 5 most frequent reasons for hospitalization for each age group in 2010 as well as the change in the rate of hospitalization for these diagnoses since 1997. Overall, the hospitalization rate increased with age—with the exception of infants, who had a high hospitalization rate (11,438 per 10,000 population) primarily because of newborn births, which accounted for 86 percent of stays for children younger than 1 year.

For children ages 1-17, the top 3 principal diagnoses in 2010—mood disorders, pneumonia, and asthma—each occurred in 17 stays per 10,000 population. The rate of hospitalization for asthma fell by 30 percent and doubled for skin and subcutaneous tissue infections between 1997 and 2010.

Among adults ages 18-44, 4 of the top 5 conditions were related to pregnancy and childbirth: trauma to the perineum and vulva due to childbirth, maternal stay with a previous Cesarean section, prolonged pregnancy, and hypertension complicating pregnancy and childbirth. The rate of hospitalization for delivery following a Cesarean section increased 82 percent; however, the rate of hospitalization for normal pregnancy and/or delivery fell 56 percent between 1997 and 2010 (data not shown).

In 2010, osteoarthritis was the most common principal diagnosis among adults ages 45-64 and 65-84. The rate of hospitalization for this condition increased 164 percent and 60 percent, respectively, among these age groups between 1997 and 2010. Cardiovascular conditions were also common among adults age 45 and older. The rate of hospitalization for nonspecific chest pain and coronary atherosclerosis for adults ages 45-64 decreased 16 percent and 64 percent, respectively, between 1997 and 2010.

Congestive heart failure (CHF), pneumonia, septicemia, and cardiac dysrhythmias accounted for 4 of the top 5 conditions among adults ages 65-84 and age 85 and older. Hospitalization rates for CHF, pneumonia, and septicemia were higher by a factor of 2 or more for adults age 85 and older, compared to rates among adults ages 65-84. From 1997 to 2010, the hospitalization rate for CHF and pneumonia decreased among adults age 65 and older. In contrast, hospitalization rates for septicemia increased by 80 percent among adults ages 65-84 and by 56 percent among adults age 85 and older.


Table 3. Number of stays, stays per 10,000 population, and percentage change in rate of the most frequent principal diagnoses for hospital stays by age, 1997 and 2010
Age group and principal CCS diagnosis Number of stays in thousands Stays per 10,000 population Percentage change in rate
1997 2010 1997 2010 1997-2010
All ages, total stays 34,681 39,008 1,272 1,261 -1%
<1 year, total stays 4,436 4,521 11,825 11,438 -3%
Liveborn 3,777 3,906 10,070 9,881 -2%
Acute bronchitis 109 94 290 238 -18%
Hemolytic jaundice and perinatal jaundice 33 41 88 104 17%
Pneumonia* 56 36 151 90 -40%
Short gestation; low birth weight; and fetal growth retardation 22 22 59 356 -5%
1-17 years, total stays 1,821 1,754 271 250 -8%
Mood disorders 64 120 10 17 80%
Pneumonia* 135 119 20 17 -16%
Asthma 159 116 24 17 -30%
Appendicitis and other appendiceal conditions 65 85 10 12 25%
Skin and subcutaneous tissue infections 29 62 4 9 107%
18-44 years, total stays 9,444 9,706 850 859 1%
Obstetrics-related trauma to perineum and vulva 676 648 61 57 -6%
Previous Cesarean-section 270 500 24 44 82%
Mood disorders 335 426 30 38 25%
Prolonged pregnancy 99 268 9 24 167%
Hypertension complicating pregnancy; childbirth and the puerperium 172 238 15 21 36%
45-64 years, total stays 6,496 9,755 1,154 1,193 3%
Osteoarthritis 105 404 19 49 164%
Spondylosis; intervertebral disc disorders; other back problems 190 299 34 37 8%
Nonspecific chest pain 242 295 43 36 -16%
Coronary atherosclerosis and other heart disease 526 276 93 34 -64%
Mood disorders 136 265 24 32 34%
65-84 years, total stays 10,121 10,169 3,319 2,913 -12%
Osteoarthritis 281 514 92 147 60%
Congestive heart failure; nonhypertensive 581 467 191 134 -30%
Pneumonia* 514 410 168 118 -30%
Septicemia (except in labor) 195 402 64 115 80%
Cardiac dysrhythmias 333 387 109 111 2%
85+ years, total stays 2,362 3,103 6,049 5,608 -7%
Congestive heart failure; nonhypertensive 202 235 517 424 -18%
Pneumonia* 197 183 504 331 -34%
Septicemia (except in labor) 76 169 196 305 56%
Urinary tract infections 75 145 191 262 37%
Cardiac dysrhythmias 70 125 179 225 26%
CCS: Clinical Classifications Software
*Pneumonia: except that caused by tuberculosis or sexually transmitted disease
Source: AHRQ, Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1997 and 2010


Bipolar disorders and depressive disorders among children ages 1-17, 1997 and 2010
One age-related finding of particular interest warranted further analysis—mood disorders, the fourth-ranked principal diagnosis among children ages 1-17 in 1997, was the most frequent principal diagnosis in 2010. Table 4 shows the number of stays and rate of hospitalization for the two specific diagnoses that constitute mood disorders—bipolar disorders and depressive disorders—by age within the 1-17 age group.

Overall, depressive disorders comprised the largest share of mood disorders, with the rate of hospitalization highest among children ages 15-17 (29 stays per 10,000 population in 2010). The rate of hospitalization for depressive disorders among children remained relatively stable between 1997 and 2010. In contrast, there was more than a four-fold increase in the rate of hospitalization for bipolar disorders among children ages 1-17 between 1997 and 2010. This increase occurred for all ages (where data were available), with the highest rates among children ages 10-14 and 15-17 (11 and 21 stays per 10,000 population, respectively, in 2010). Bipolar disorders accounted for an increasing share of hospital stays for mood disorders among children ages 1-17 in 2010 (48 percent) versus 1997 (16 percent).


Table 4. Number of stays, stays per 10,000 population, and percentage change in rate of principal bipolar disorders and depressive disorders among children ages 1-17, 1997 and 2010
Multi-level principal CCS diagnosis Number of stays in thousands Stays per 10,000 population Percentage change in rate
1997 2010 1997 2010 1997-2010
Bipolar disorders
1-17 years, total stays 10,300 57,300 1.5 8.2 434%
1-4 years * 300 * 0.2 *
5-9 years 800 6,500 0.4 3.2 696%
10-14 years 3,800 23,200 2.0 11.2 475%
15-17 years 5,600 27,300 4.8 21.1 345%
Depressive disorders
1-17 years, total stays 53,800 62,900 8.0 9.0 12%
1-4 years 42 * 0.0 * *
5-9 years 3,100 2,200 1.5 1.1 -28%
10-14 years 21,200 23,300 10.8 11.2 4%
15-17 years 29,400 37,400 24.9 29.0 17%
CCS: Clinical Classifications Software. The single-level CCS diagnosis category, mood disorders, comprises two multi-level CCS categories: bipolar disorders and depressive disorders.
* Data are not available.
Source: AHRQ, Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1997 and 2010


Most frequent principal diagnoses by payer during hospital stays, 2010
Table 5 shows the top 5 principal diagnoses for hospital stays by primary payer. The principal diagnoses for hospitalizations by primary payer generally varied, although some conditions were common across all payer types.

There were 14.5 million stays with Medicare as the primary payer in 2010. CHF was the most common principal diagnosis, accounting for 5 percent of all Medicare stays. The number of stays for pneumonia decreased slightly between 1997 and 2010 (12 percent), but there was an increase in the number of stays billed to Medicare for septicemia (122 percent), osteoarthritis (87 percent), and cardiac dysrhythmias (32 percent).

Medicaid was the primary payer for 8.3 million stays in 2010—an increase of 47 percent from 1997. Three pregnancy- and childbirth-related conditions accounted for nearly 30 percent of all Medicaid stays in 2010: newborn birth, trauma to the perineum and vulva caused by childbirth, and previous Cesarean section. The number of stays for newborn birth and previous Cesarean section both grew from 1997 to 2010 (48 percent and 169 percent, respectively). Mood disorders was the third most common condition with Medicaid as the primary payer, increasing 78 percent from 1997 to 2010.

Private insurance was the primary payer for 12.5 million stays in 2010. Newborn birth was the most common reason for stays billed to private insurance, accounting for 15 percent of stays. Osteoarthritis was the second most common principal diagnosis among private insurance stays and more than tripled between 1997 and 2010.

The uninsured accounted for 2.3 million stays in 2010—a 40-percent increase since 1997. Newborn births accounted for 7 percent of all uninsured stays in 2010. Four of the most common conditions for uninsured hospital stays increased by more than 50 percent from 1997 to 2010: alcohol-related disorders and nonspecific chest pain grew by 52 percent and 68 percent, respectively; stays for mood disorders nearly doubled; and skin and subcutaneous tissue infections nearly tripled.


Table 5. Number of stays, percentage distribution, and percentage change in stays of the most frequent principal diagnoses for hospital stays by payer, 1997 and 2010
Payer* and principal CCS diagnosis Number of stays in thousands Percentage of payer-specific total stays Percentage change in number of stays
1997 2010 1997 2010 1997-2010
All payers, total stays 34,681 39,008 100% 100% 12%
Medicare 12,618 14,545 100% 100% 15%
Congestive heart failure; nonhypertensive 757 712 6% 5% -6%
Pneumonia** 703 622 6% 4% -12%
Septicemia (except in labor) 276 613 2% 4% 122%
Osteoarthritis 279 522 2% 4% 87%
Cardiac dysrhythmias 375 494 3% 3% 32%
Medicaid 5,645 8,273 100% 100% 47%
Liveborn 1,225 1,812 22% 22% 48%
Obstetrics-related trauma to perineum and vulva 224 267 4% 3% 19%
Mood disorders 147 262 3% 3% 78%
Previous Cesarean section 84 226 1% 3% 169%
Pneumonia** 166 177 3% 2% 6%
Private insurance 13,388 12,454 100% 100% -7%
Liveborn 2,205 1,807 16% 15% -18%
Osteoarthritis 117 390 1% 3% 234%
Obstetrics-related trauma to perineum and vulva 431 362 3% 3% -16%
Spondylosis; intervertebral disc disorders; other back problems 258 289 2% 2% 12%
Mood disorders 227 266 2% 2% 17%
Uninsured 1,677 2,341 100% 100% 40%
Liveborn 191 169 11% 7% -12%
Mood disorders 55 108 3% 5% 96%
Skin and subcutaneous tissue infections 28 80 2% 3% 184%
Alcohol-related disorders 48 73 3% 3% 52%
Nonspecific chest pain 39 66 2% 3% 68%
CCS: Clinical Classifications Software
*Population denominators are not available by payer
** Pneumonia: except that caused by tuberculosis or sexually transmitted disease
Source: AHRQ, Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1997 and 2010


Data Source

The estimates in this Statistical Brief are based upon data from the HCUP 2010 NIS. Historical data were drawn from the 1997 NIS. Supplemental sources included data on national population estimates from "Intercensal Estimates of the Resident Population by Single Year of Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin for the United States: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2010," Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Release date: September 2011. Available at (http://www.census.gov/popest/data/intercensal/national/nat2010.html). (Accessed January 7, 2013).

Supplemental sources also included data on national population estimates from "Intercensal Estimates of the United States Resident Population by Age and Sex, 1990-2000: Selected Months," Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau, Release date: August 2004. Available at (http://www.census.gov/popest/data/intercensal/national/index.html). (Accessed January 7, 2013).

Many hypothesis tests were conducted for this Statistical Brief. Thus, to decrease the number of false-positive results, we reduced the significance level to .001 for individual tests.

Definitions

Diagnoses, ICD-9-CM, and Clinical Classifications Software (CCS)
The principal diagnosis is that condition established after study to be chiefly responsible for the patient's admission to the hospital. Secondary diagnoses are concomitant conditions that coexist at the time of admission or that develop during the stay.

ICD-9-CM is the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, which assigns numeric codes to diagnoses. There are about 14,000 ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes.

CCS categorizes ICD-9-CM diagnoses into a manageable number of clinically meaningful categories.1 This "clinical grouper" makes it easier to quickly understand patterns of diagnoses. CCS categories identified as "Other" are typically not reported; these categories include miscellaneous, otherwise unclassifiable diagnoses that may be difficult to interpret as a group.

The single-level diagnosis CCS aggregates illnesses and conditions into 285 mutually exclusive categories. The multi-level CCS groups single-level CCS categories into broader categories (e.g., "Diseases of the Circulatory System", "Mental Disorders", and "Injury") and also splits single-level CCS categories to provide more detail about particular groupings of codes.

Types of hospitals included in HCUP
HCUP is based on data from community hospitals, defined as short-term, non-Federal, general and other hospitals, excluding hospital units of other institutions (e.g., prisons). HCUP data include obstetrics and gynecology, otolaryngology, orthopedic, cancer, pediatric, public, and academic medical hospitals. Excluded are long-term care, rehabilitation, psychiatric, and alcoholism and chemical dependency hospitals. However, if a patient received long-term care, rehabilitation, or treatment for psychiatric or chemical dependency conditions in a community hospital, the discharge record for that stay will be included in the NIS.

Unit of analysis
The unit of analysis is the hospital discharge (i.e., the hospital stay), not a person or patient. This means that a person who is admitted to the hospital multiple times in one year will be counted each time as a separate "discharge" from the hospital.

Payer
Payer is the expected primary payer for the hospital stay. To make coding uniform across all HCUP data sources, payer combines detailed categories into more general groups:

  • Medicare: includes fee-for-service and managed care Medicare patients
  • Medicaid: includes fee-for-service and managed care Medicaid patients. Patients covered by the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) may be included here. Because most State data do not identify SCHIP patients specifically, it is not possible to present this information separately.
  • Private Insurance: includes Blue Cross, commercial carriers, and private HMOs and PPOs
  • Other: includes Worker's Compensation, TRICARE/CHAMPUS, CHAMPVA, Title V, and other government programs
  • Uninsured: includes an insurance status of "self-pay" and "no charge."
When more than one payer is listed for a hospital discharge, the first-listed payer is used.

About HCUP

HCUP is a family of powerful health care databases, software tools, and products for advancing research. Sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HCUP includes the largest all-payer encounter-level collection of longitudinal health care data (inpatient, ambulatory surgery, and emergency department) in the United States, beginning in 1988. HCUP is a Federal-State-Industry Partnership that brings together the data collection efforts of many organizations—such as State data organizations, hospital associations, private data organizations, and the Federal government—to create a national information resource.

HCUP would not be possible without the contributions of the following data collection Partners from across the United States:

Alaska State Hospital and Nursing Home Association
Arizona Department of Health Services
Arkansas Department of Health
California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development
Colorado Hospital Association
Connecticut Hospital Association
Florida Agency for Health Care Administration
Georgia Hospital Association
Hawaii Health Information Corporation
Illinois Department of Public Health
Indiana Hospital Association
Iowa Hospital Association
Kansas Hospital Association
Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services
Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals
Maine Health Data Organization
Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission
Massachusetts Center for Health Information and Analysis
Michigan Health & Hospital Association
Minnesota Hospital Association
Mississippi Department of Health
Missouri Hospital Industry Data Institute
Montana MHA - An Association of Montana Health Care Providers
Nebraska Hospital Association
Nevada Department of Health and Human Services
New Hampshire Department of Health & Human Services
New Jersey Department of Health
New Mexico Department of Health
New York State Department of Health
North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services
Ohio Hospital Association
Oklahoma State Department of Health
Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems
Oregon Health Policy and Research
Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council
Rhode Island Department of Health
South Carolina Budget & Control Board
South Dakota Association of Healthcare Organizations
Tennessee Hospital Association
Texas Department of State Health Services
Utah Department of Health
Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems
Virginia Health Information
Washington State Department of Health
West Virginia Health Care Authority
Wisconsin Department of Health Services
Wyoming Hospital Association

About the NIS

The HCUP Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) is a nationwide database of hospital inpatient stays. The NIS is nationally representative of all community hospitals (i.e., short-term, non-Federal, nonrehabilitation hospitals). The NIS is a sample of hospitals and includes all patients from each hospital, regardless of payer. It is drawn from a sampling frame that contains hospitals comprising more than 95 percent of all discharges in the United States. The vast size of the NIS allows the study of topics at both the national and regional levels for specific subgroups of patients. In addition, NIS data are standardized across years to facilitate ease of use.

About HCUPnet

HCUPnet is an online query system that offers instant access to the largest set of all-payer health care databases publicly available. HCUPnet has an easy step-by-step query system, allowing for tables and graphs to be generated on national and regional statistics, as well as trends for community hospitals in the United States. HCUPnet generates statistics using data from HCUP's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the State Inpatient Databases (SID), and the State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD).

For More Information

For more information about HCUP, visit http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/.

For additional HCUP statistics, visit HCUPnet, our interactive query system, at http://hcupnet.ahrq.gov/.

For information on other hospitalizations in the United States, download HCUP Facts and Figures: Statistics on Hospital-Based Care in the United States in 2009, located at http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports.jsp.

For a detailed description of HCUP, more information on the design of the NIS, and methods to calculate estimates, please refer to the following publications:

Introduction to the HCUP Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2010. Online. May 2012. U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Available at http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/db/nation/nis/NISIntroduction2010.pdf. (Accessed January 7, 2013).

Houchens R, Elixhauser A. Final Report on Calculating Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) Variances, 2001. HCUP Methods Series Report #2003-2. Online. June 2005 (revised June 6, 2005). U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Available at http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/CalculatingNISVariances200106092005.pdf. (Accessed January 7, 2013).

Houchens RL, Elixhauser A. Using the HCUP Nationwide Inpatient Sample to Estimate Trends. (Updated for 1988-2004). HCUP Methods Series Report #2006-05. Online. August 18, 2006. U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Available at http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/methods/2006_05_NISTrendsReport_1988-2004.pdf. (Accessed January 7, 2013).

Suggested Citation

Pfuntner, A (Truven Health Analytics), Wier, LM (Truven Health Analytics), Stocks, C (AHRQ). Most Frequent Conditions in U.S. Hospitals, 2010. HCUP Statistical Brief #148. January 2013. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. Available at http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/statbriefs/sb148.pdf.

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the contributions of Eva Witt of Truven Health Analytics.

***

AHRQ welcomes questions and comments from readers of this publication who are interested in obtaining more information about access, cost, use, financing, and quality of health care in the United States. We also invite you to tell us how you are using this Statistical Brief and other HCUP data and tools, and to share suggestions on how HCUP products might be enhanced to further meet your needs. Please e-mail us at hcup@ahrq.gov or send a letter to the address below:

Irene Fraser, Ph.D., Director
Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
540 Gaither Road
Rockville, MD 20850



1 HCUP Clinical Classifications Software (CCS). Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. Available at http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/toolssoftware/ccs/ccs.jsp. Updated March 2012. (Accessed January 7, 2013).

Internet Citation: Statistical Brief #148. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). January 2013. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov//reports/statbriefs/sb148.jsp.
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