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HCUP Facts and Figures
Statistics on Hospital-Based Care in the United States, 2007
TABLE OF CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS

INTRODUCTION

HCUP PARTNERS

1. OVERVIEW

2. DIAGNOSES

3. PROCEDURES

4. COSTS

5. PAYERS

SOURCES/METHODS

DEFINITIONS

FOR MORE INFO

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

CITATION

FACTS & FIGURES 2007 PDF
EXHIBIT 2.3 Most Frequent Principal Diagnoses by Gender PDF

Number of Discharges, Percent Distribution, Rank and Growth of the Most Frequent Principal CCS Diagnoses for Inpatient Hospital Stays by Gender, 2007
PRINCIPAL CCS DIAGNOSIS NUMBER OF DISCHARGES IN THOUSANDS PERCENT OF GENDER-SPECIFIC DISCHARGES MALE PERCENT OF DIAGNOSIS-SPECIFIC DISCHARGES CUMULATIVE GROWTH
1997-2007
MALES FEMALES MALES FEMALES MALES FEMALES
All diagnoses* 16,231 23,203 100.0% 100.0% 41.0% 14% 13%
Chronic conditions† 6,914 7,501 42.6 32.3 47.9 5 4
Pregnancy and childbirth   5,022   21.6 0.0   16
Liveborn (newborn infant) 2,322 2,212‡ 14.3 9.5 51.2 20 20
Coronary atherosclerosis (coronary artery disease) 601 362 3.7 1.6 62.4 -28 -37
Pneumonia 562 608 3.5 2.6 48.0 -6 -4
Congestive heart failure 500 524‡ 3.1 2.3 48.8 11 -3
Acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) 373 252 2.3 1.1 59.6 -16 -13
Cardiac dysrhythmias (irregular heart beat) 360 370‡ 2.2 1.6 49.3 31 25
Non-specific chest pain 352 435 2.2 1.9 44.7 43 50
Mood disorders (depression and bipolar disorder) 330 442 2.0 1.9 42.7 32 13
Septicemia (blood infection) 322 354 2.0 1.5 47.6 77 53
Skin and subcutaneous tissue infections 320 282 2.0 1.2 53.1 90 75
Osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) 314 498 1.9 2.1 38.7 96 94
Urinary tract infections 152 383 0.9 1.7 28.4 30 32
* Excludes a small number of discharges (108,000 or 0.3 percent) with missing gender.
† Includes the number of discharges with a principal diagnosis that is considered to be a chronic condition.
‡ Female discharges are not statistically different from male discharges at p‹0.05.
Source: AHRQ, Center for Delivery, Organization, and Markets, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 1997 and 2007.

 

This exhibit shows the top 10 conditions for men and women in the hospital in addition to conditions related to childbirth and newborn infants. Most diagnoses are common to both males and females, if those related to childbirth are excluded. However, some diagnoses were more frequent in one gender, in part because of differences between males and females in health-seeking behaviors and attitudes.

  • Females accounted for almost 6 out of every 10 hospital stays—23.2 million stays in 2007. About 22 percent of all female hospitalizations were related to pregnancy and childbirth.
  • Males accounted for 16.2 million hospitalizations in 2007.
  • Five heart-related diagnoses—coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, heart attacks, cardiac dysrhythmias, and non-specific chest pain—were among the ten most common principal diagnoses for both male and female hospitalizations.
    • Males accounted for 62 percent of hospital stays for coronary artery disease and 60 percent of stays for heart attack. Hospitalizations for these conditions decreased for both males (coronary artery disease by 28 percent and heart attacks by 16 percent) and females (coronary artery disease by 37 percent and heart attacks by 13 percent) between 1997 and 2007.
    • The number of hospital stays for irregular heart beat (360,000 stays for males and 370,000 for females) and congestive heart failure (500,000 stays for males and 524,000 for females) were similar for males and females.
    • Women accounted for a greater share of hospitalizations for non-specific chest pain (55 percent of stays) than men (45 percent of stays).
  • Women accounted for a greater number of hospital stays for mood disorders in 2007 than did men (442,000 female discharges versus 330,000 male discharges). The number of stays for mood disorders grew by 32 percent for men and by 13 percent for women between 1997 and 2007.
  • Infections such as septicemia, skin and subcutaneous tissue infection, and urinary tract infection were common reasons for hospital stays among both men and women in 2007 and grew rapidly for both genders between 1997 and 2007.
    • Stays for septicemia rose 77 percent among men and 53 percent among women. In 2007, 2 percent of male hospital stays and 1.5 percent of female hospital stays were due to septicemia.
    • The number of stays for skin and subcutaneous tissue infections increased 90 percent for men and 75 percent for women. This condition accounted for 2 percent of male hospitalizations and 1.2 percent of female hospitalizations in 2007.
    • Growth was similar in stays for urinary tract infections for women (32 percent) and men (30 percent). In 2007, this condition was responsible for 1.7 percent of hospitalizations among women and 0.9 percent among men.
  • Degenerative joint disease caused many more hospitalizations for females (498,000 discharges) than for males (314,000 discharges) in 2007. Over 61 percent of all discharges with this condition were for females. Hospital stays for degenerative joint disease grew at close to 100 percent for both males and females between 1997 and 2007.


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Internet Citation: Facts and Figures 2007. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). September 2009. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/factsandfigures/2007/exhibit2_3.jsp.
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