Skip Navigation

Classifications Software (CCS) for Mortality Reporting
The CCS for Mortality Reporting is one of the HCUP tools that can be applied to databases that are coded using ICD-10. These tools are created by AHRQ through a Federal-State-Industry partnership.
 
 
Classifications Software (CCS) for Mortality Reporting

The Classifications Software (CCS) for Mortality Reporting is one in a family of databases and software tools developed as part of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), a Federal-State-Industry partnership sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. HCUP databases, tools, and software inform decision making at the national, State, and community levels.

Contents:

The Classifications Software (CCS) for Mortality Reporting is a diagnosis categorization scheme that can be employed in many types of projects analyzing data on diagnoses. This tool is based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), a uniform and standardized coding system, which has been used in the U.S. for mortality reporting since 1999. The ICD-10’s multitude of codes – more than 32,000 diagnosis codes in all – are collapsed into a smaller number of clinically meaningful categories that are sometimes more useful for presenting descriptive statistics than are individual ICD-10-CM codes.

CCS for Mortality Reporting categories can be employed in many types of projects analyzing data on diagnoses. For example, they can be used to:
  • Identify populations for disease-specific studies
  • Gain a better understanding of the distribution of certain conditions across disease groupings
  • Examine trends in mortality by broad diagnosis groupings.

For the history of CCS development, see the original CCS Software and User’s Guide.
Return to Contents
 

The CCS for Mortality Reporting aggregates illnesses and conditions into 260 mutually exclusive categories, most of which are clinically homogeneous. Some heterogeneous categories were necessary; these combine several less common individual conditions within a body system. The category names for the CCS for ICD-10 are in the label file dxlabel_2006.csv.
Return to Contents
 

The Fiscal Year 2006 version of the CCS for Mortality Reporting is valid through September 2009. No ICD-10 coding changes were implemented by the World Health Organization in 2007, 2008, or 2009, thus no changes were necessary in this tool for those years.
Return to Contents
 

In practice, ICD-10 diagnoses are represented by 3- to 5-character codes with explicit decimals. Each code begins with an alphabetic character that generally corresponds to the ICD-10 chapter:

Code Chapter
A-B Infectious and parasitic diseases
C Malignant neoplasms
D00-D09 In situ neoplasms
D50-D89 Diseases of blood, blood-forming organs, immune mechanism
E Endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disease
F Mental and behavioral disorders
G Diseases of the nervous system
H00-H59 Diseases of the eye and adnexa
H60-H95 Diseases of the ear and mastoid process
I Diseases of the circulatory system
J Diseases of the respiratory system
K Diseases of the digestive system
L Diseases of skin and subcutaneous tissue
M Diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue
N Diseases of the genitourinary system
O Pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium
P Certain conditions originating in the perinatal period
Q Congenital malformations, deformations, and chromosomal abnormalities
R Symptoms, signs, and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, not elsewhere classified
S-T Injury, poisoning, and certain other consequences of external causes
V-Y External causes of morbidity and mortality
Z Factors influencing health status and contact with health services


In the tool file available here and in the vast majority of data files, ICD–10 codes are represented as 5–character alphanumeric codes with implicit decimals (i.e., the decimal point may not be present in your data). Alphanumeric codes are always enclosed in quotation marks. Examples are given below.

Condition ICD-10 diagnosis code Alpha code(implicit decimals)
Bacterial pneumonia J15 ‘J15 ’
Pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae J15.0 ‘J150 ’


For proper handling of diagnosis codes:
  • Alphanumeric diagnosis codes must be left–justified so that there are 2 spaces following a 3-character diagnosis code and 1 space following a 4-character diagnosis code.
  • Trailing blanks should never be zero–padded (filled with zeroes so that all 5 characters are filled for codes that should be 3 or 4 characters long).

Certain WHO ICD-10 codes found in the CCS tool contain special ASCII symbols in the final position of the code. These symbols, "+" and "*", are used by clinical coders when making initial coding assignments. They should be removed from the tool prior to merging with user data in cases where said data do not contain these characters. One could use the Replace feature in Excel to remove them, or alternatively, one could employ SAS code similar to the following example in a SAS Data Step: icd10 code = compress (icd10code, "*+"); .
Return to Contents
 

The CCS for Mortality Reporting consists of one translation table in Comma Separated Values (CSV) file format that creates CCS for Mortality Reporting categories for data sets that contain ICD-10 diagnosis information. How the translation file is used will depend on the software system being used. For example, if SAS is employed, the translation table could be adapted to create a SAS PROC FORMAT. If SPSS is used, the translation file could be adapted into VALUE LABELS or into a series of recodes. In Stata, the translation table could be modified through a series of GENERATE and REPLACE commands.
Return to Contents
 


Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Statistics from the HCUP 3 Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 1992: Principal diagnoses. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP 3) Pocket Guide. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; 1996. AHCPR Publication No. 96-0029.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Recommended framework for presenting injury mortality data. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 1997, Aug 29;46(no. RR14):1-30.

Cowen ME, Dusseau DJ, Toth BG, et al. Casemix adjustment of managed care claims data using the clinical classifications for health policy research method. Medical Care 1998, 36:1108-1113.

DRGs: Diagnosis related groups definitions manual, version 12.0. Wallingford, CT: 3M Health Information Systems; 1994.

Duffy SQ, Elixhauser A, Sommers JP. Diagnosis and procedure combinations in hospital inpatient data. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP 3) Research Note 5. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; 1996. AHCPR Publication No. 96-0047.

Elixhauser A, Andrews RM, Fox, S. Clinical classifications for health policy research: Discharge statistics by principal diagnosis and procedure. Provider Studies Research Note 17. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; 1993. AHCPR Publication No. 93-0043.

Elixhauser A, McCarthy EM. Clinical classifications for health policy research, version 2: Hospital inpatient statistics. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP 3) Research Note 1. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; 1996. AHCPR Publication No. 96-0017.

Elixhauser A, Steiner CA, Whittington C, et al. Clinical classifications for health policy research: Hospital inpatient statistics, 1995. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, HCUP 3 Research Note. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; 1998. AHCPR Publication No. 98-0049.

Elixhauser A, Steiner CA. Hospital inpatient statistics, 1996. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Research Note. Rockville, MD: Agency for Health Care Policy and Research; in press, 1999. AHCPR Publication No. 99-0034.

Public Health Service and Health Care Financing Administration. International classification of diseases, 9th revision, clinical modification. Vols. 1, 2, and 3; fifth edition. Washington, DC: Public Health Service; 1994. DHHS Publication No. (PHS) 94 1260.
Return to Contents
 

Send Questions & Comments to: hcup@ahrq.gov.
Return to Contents
 

Web Browser Download: Your browser may support loading the files from this Web page. To download the files, click on the following links with the right mouse button and select "Save Link As" (Netscape) or "Save Target As" (Internet Explorer). After saving a file, find the file by using Windows® Explorer (Windows® 98/95/NT/XP) or File Manager (Windows® 3.x) and then open it by double-clicking on it.

CCS for ICD-10 Documentation

CCS Program File (Used to map ICD-10 codes into CCS categories)

Current as of January 2009
Return to Contents
 

Questions regarding the CCS for Mortality Reporting may be directed to HCUP User Support through the following channels: Phone (toll free): 1-866-290-HCUP.
Return to Contents
 

Internet Citation: Classifications Software (CCS) for Mortality Reporting. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). September 2014. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD. www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/toolssoftware/icd_10/ccs_icd_10.jsp.
Are you having problems viewing or printing pages on this Website?
If you have comments, suggestions, and/or questions, please contact hcup@ahrq.gov.
Privacy Notice, Viewers & Players
Last modified 9/15/14